Another 17 Vim Tips

posted by Arkham on October 6th, 2009

success_vim

  1. <Ctrl>-k + e + ! – Write ‘è’ character.
  2. <Ctrl>-k + e + – Write ‘é’ character.
  3. !!date – Insert date in current line.
  4. g, / g; – Jump back/forward to the locations that have been edited.
  5. zf – Fold selected text.
  6. zfa} – Fold the function enclosing the cursor.
  7. zR / zM – If foldmethod is set, open/close all folds.
  8. <Ctrl>-w + (/+) – In splitted views, reduce/increase current zone height.
  9. <Ctrl>-w + (</>) – In splitted views, reduce/increase current zone width.
  10. :vimgrep /pattern/ files – Search for pattern in the provided list of files.
  11. :cn and :cN to jump between vimgrep results.
  12. :clist to display all vimgrep result and :cc number to jump to a specific one.
  13. :%s/\<and\>/or/g – Replace all occurences of “and” with “or”, leaving words like “demand” unchanged.
  14. :%s/foo/bar/gi – Replace case insensitively.
  15. * / # – Search for the next/previous occurence of the word under the cursor.
  16. /\cfoo\Cbar/ – Matches “foobar”, “Foobar” and “FOObar”.
  17. /\([a-z]\)\([a-z]\)\2\1/ – Matches “abba” and “deed”.

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17 Vim Tips

posted by Arkham on October 5th, 2009

vim_bar

  1. <Ctrl>-o – Switch from insert mode to command mode for one single command.
  2. vim +linenumber file – Open file at line number.
  3. vim +/pattern file – Open file at first occurence of pattern.
  4. :next files – Open a list of files, each in a new buffer.
  5. :up[date] – Save a modified file.
  6. “byy + “bp – Copy a line inside named buffer “b” and paste it.
  7. <Ctrl>-] – Follow green links in documentation pages.
  8. <Ctrl>-t – Go back to the previous documentation page.
  9. >ap – Indent whole paragraph.
  10. 10dd + 2. – Delete 10 lines, repeat twice (delete 20 lines more).
  11. VU – Make the whole line uppercase.
  12. V10j + : + !sort – sort alphabetically next 10 lines.
  13. :!uname -a – Display system information.
  14. :! wc % – Display information about current file.
  15. :r!uname -a – Insert system information into the next line.
  16. gg=G – Reformat whole file.
  17. <Ctrl>-n – Start autocompletion.

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Sed by examples, Part 2

posted by Arkham on June 29th, 2009

sed_logo_white

sed (stream editor) is a Unix utility which (a) parses text files and (b) implements a programming language which can apply textual transformations to such files.
It reads input files line by line (sequentially), applying the operation which has been specified via the command line (or a sed script), and then outputs the line.

Substitution

  1. Substitute, for every line, the first occurence of foo (if any) with spam:

    # test.txt
    foo bar spam foo
    spam foo bar egg
    sausage foo spam egg
    spam spam spam
    sed -e 's/foo/spam/' test.txt
  2. Substitute every occurence of foo with spam:

    sed -e 's/foo/spam/g' test.txt
  3. Substitute every occurence of foo with spam in the first two lines:

    sed -e '1,2s/foo/spam/g' test.txt
  4. Substitute every occurence of foo with spam in every line that starts with sausage and ends with egg:

    sed -e '/^sausage.*egg$/s/foo/spam/g' test.txt
  5. Substitute paths:

    sed -e 's|/usr/bin/|/usr/local/bin|g' script.sh
  6. Remove html tags:

    <html>
    <body>
    Hello World!
    </body>
    </html>
    sed -e 's/<[^>]*>//g' hello.html

Advanced substitution

  1. Append (that’s what she said) to every line ( & represents what matches):

    sed -e "s/^.*$/& (that's what she said)/g" test.txt
  2. Append lol, rofl and lmao to the first three words of every line:

    sed -e 's/\(^[^ ]*\) \([^ ]*\) \([^ ]*\)/\1lol \2rofl \3lmao/' test.txt

Multiple Commands

  1. Print a file alternating row numbers:

    sed -n -e '=;p' test.txt
  2. Print some information about your cpu first core:

    # script.sed
    1,/^$/{
        /model name/p
        /flags/p
        /bogomips/p
    }
    sed -n -f script.sed /proc/cpuinfo
  3. Add a line before/after each line or replace line:

    # script.sed
    i\
    This line will be inserted before each line
    # script.sed
    a\
    This line will be inserted after each line
    # script.sed
    c\
    This line will be inserted in each line
    sed -f script.sed test.txt
  4. Tags: , , , ,

Sed by examples

posted by Arkham on June 29th, 2009

Canon Tosh SED

sed (stream editor) is a Unix utility which (a) parses text files and (b) implements a programming language which can apply textual transformations to such files.
It reads input files line by line (sequentially), applying the operation which has been specified via the command line (or a sed script), and then outputs the line.

Delete

  1. Delete the first line of a file:

    sed -e '1d' /etc/fstab
  2. Delete from the second to the tenth line:

    sed -e '2,10d' /etc/fstab
  3. Delete lines starting with #:

    sed -e '/^#/d' /etc/fstab

Print

  1. Print lines starting with #:

    sed -n -e '/^#/p' /etc/fstab
  2. Print blocks of text enclosed by BEGIN and END:

    sed -n -e '/BEGIN/,/END/p' script.awk
  3. Print Device section in xorg.conf:

    sed -n -e '/Section "Device"/,/EndSection/p' /etc/X11/xorg.conf
  4. Print main function in a C source file:

    sed -n -e '/main[[:space:]]*(/,/^}/p' source.c

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How to colorize bash prompt easily

posted by Arkham on June 24th, 2009

lost_numbers_fan

Sometimes, the bash prompt can look a little dull and it may become difficult to recognize where the output of a command ends. Here I provide with a very simple way to customize your bash prompt by adding some colors.

First of all, add these colors definition to your .bashrc

## Fancy colors
red='\[\e[0;31m\]'
RED='\[\e[1;31m\]'
blue='\[\e[0;34m\]'
BLUE='\[\e[1;34m\]'
cyan='\[\e[0;36m\]'
CYAN='\[\e[1;36m\]'
black='\[\e[0;30m\]'
BLACK='\[\e[1;30m\]'
green='\[\e[0;32m\]'
GREEN='\[\e[1;32m\]'
yellow='\[\e[0;33m\]'
YELLOW='\[\e[1;33m\]'
magenta='\[\e[0;35m\]'
MAGENTA='\[\e[1;35m\]'
white='\[\e[0;37m\]'
WHITE='\[\e[1;37m\]'
NC='\[\e[0m\]' # No Color

The variables you want to use are

  • \u – username
  • \h – host name
  • \w – current absolute path
  • \W for current relative path
  • \$ – te prompt character (eg. ‘#’)

For example, my current setup looks like:

PS1="${green}\u${NC}@${green}\h ${BLUE}\w${NC} ${GREEN}\$ ${NC} "

Enjoy ;)

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